Professor of Law and Chancellor's Social Justice Scholar
Rose Cuison Villazor
Newark Campus
S.I. Newhouse Center for Law and Justice
123 Washington Street
Newark, NJ 07102

Professor Rose Cuison Villazor is an expert in immigration, citizenship, property law and race and the law. She is a nationally-regarded scholar with an active record in social justice issues and is the founder of the Rutgers Center for Immigration Law, Policy and Justice.

  • Biography
  • Publications
  • Expertise
Biography

Professor Villazor teaches, researches and writes in the areas of immigration and citizenship law, property law, Asian Americans and the law, equal protection law and critical race theory.  Her research agenda explores legal structures and systems that determine membership and sense of belonging in the United States.

Professor Villazor’s current research projects examines the extent to which states, cities, churches and non-state actors such as universities and churches provide “sanctuary” to undocumented immigrants and refugees.

She is also working on two book projects: one on Asian Pacific Americans and the Law (forthcoming at NYU Press) and the other on Property Law and Race (forthcoming at Carolina Academic Press). Previously, Professor Rose Cuison Villazor was a Professor of Law and Martin Luther King, Jr. Hall Research Scholar at the University of California at Davis School of Law. 

She earned her BA from the University of Texas, her LLM from Columbia Law School, and her JD from American University.

 

Publications

Her published or soon-to-be-published law review articles include, “Sanctuary Networks,” in the Minnessota Law Review, “American Nationals and Interstitial Citizenship,” in the Fordham Law Review (2017), “The Undocumented Closet,” in the North Carolina Law Review (2013), “The Other Loving: Uncovering the Federal Regulation of Interracial Marriages,” in the New York University Law Review (2011), “Rediscovering Oyama v. California: At the Intersection of Property, Race and Citizenship,” in the Washington University Law Review (2010), and "Blood Quantum Land Laws: The Race versus Political Identity Dilemma," in the California Law Review (2008).   She has also been published in the Southern California Law Review, University of California at Davis Law Review, Southern Methodist University Law Review, Chicago-Kent Law Review and other journals.  She has previously taught at Hofstra Law School and SMU Law School and has served as a Visiting Professor at Columbia Law School and UC Berkeley School of Law’s Center for the Study of Law and Society. 

Her books include The Immigration and Nationality Act of 1965: Legislating a New America (2015) (with Gabriel “Jack” Chin) and Loving v. Virginia in a Post-Racial World: Rethinking Race, Sex, and Marriage (2012) (with Kevin Maillard).  She is co-editor of a forthcoming book, Asian Americans and Pacific Islanders and the Law, with Neil Gotanda and Robert Chang, which will be published by New York University Press in 2018. 

Expertise
  • Civil Rights
  • Civil Rights & Civil Liberties
  • Constitutional Law
  • Immigrant Rights
  • Immigration Law
  • Legal History