Assistant Professor of Criminal Justice and Law
Harry M. Rhea
Sociology Building
110
405 Cooper St
Camden, NJ 08102
856-225-2714

Dr. Harry M. Rhea is an expert on United States foreign policy and international criminal justice.  He previously held dual faculty appointments in the School of International and Public Affairs and the College of Law at Florida International University, where he was instrumental in developing and administering the proposal for the first Ph.D. in international crime and justice in the United States. He currently serves as Chair of the Academy of Criminal Justice Sciences International Section.

  • Biography
  • Publications
  • Expertise
Biography

Harry M. Rhea is an Assistant Professor in the Department of Sociology, Anthropology and Criminal Justice at Rutgers University and the School of Law – Camden.  After serving in the United States Marine Corps from 1995 to 1999, Dr. Rhea went on to earn several degrees, including a Post-Graduate Certificate in Human Rights Law at the University of London and a Ph.D. in law at the Irish Center for Human Rights, National University of Ireland, Galway, School of Law. He has studied at several prestigious international institutions, including the University of Oxford, Grotius Center for International Legal Studies, International Institute for Higher Studies in Criminal Sciences, Institute for International Criminal Investigations, Montreal Institute for Genocide and Human Rights Studies, and the University of Salzburg School of International Criminal Law. He is also a trained international war crimes investigator and a member of the War Crimes Research Network at the University of Oxford and the International Criminal Court Scholars Forum at the Whitney R. Harris World Law Institute, Washington University School of Law. 

Dr. Rhea has been a full-time or adjunct professor at numerous institutions.  He held a dual appointment in the Steven J. Green School of International and Public Affairs and the College of Law at Florida International University, where he helped develop the first Ph.D. in international crime and justice in the United States. He served as the program’s Associate Director.  Dr. Rhea’s scholarship is multidisciplinary and covers a variety of subjects, including criminal law, diplomacy, foreign policy, history, human rights, international law, and international relations. His scholarly articles have appeared in the University of Pennsylvania Journal of International Law, Genocide Studies International, Criminal Law Forum, Transnational Law and Contemporary Problems, and International Criminal Justice Review.  In recognition of his scholarly research, the Northeastern Association of Criminal Justice Sciences awarded him the 2013 Emerging Scholar Award in recognition of outstanding scholarly contributions to the advancement of criminal justice. 

Dr. Rhea has presented research at more than 60 national and international conferences. In 2012, the American Bar Association’s Rule of Law Initiative invited him to speak on United States policies and international human rights courts. He lectured at the 2015 Specialization Course in International Criminal Law for Young Penalists at the Siracusa International Institute for Criminal Justice and Human Rights, Italy. The course’s participants included over 60 doctoral students from more than 30 different countries studying the International Criminal Court. 

Dr. Rhea served as Executive Director of the Council for American Students in International Negotiations in 2007.  Also in 2007, he served as a delegation leader at the Sixth Session of the Assembly of States Parties to the International Criminal Court. He previously served as Editor-in-Chief of the Interdisciplinary Journal of Human Rights Law.  He is currently Associate Editor of the International Criminal Justice Review and serves on the editorial board of the African Journal of International Criminal Justice

Publications

Book:

The United States and International Criminal Tribunals: An Introduction (Supranational Criminal Law: Capita Selecta, Vol. 14, 2012).

Articles, Book Chapters and Reviews:

The First Attempt to Prosecute the International Crime of Aggression (in progress).

Is Public Support for the International Criminal Court Being Overestimated? A Methodological Experiment (with Ryan C. Meldrum, Brittany Gilmer, & Caroline Comerford) Social Science Research (under review).

The Evolution of International Criminal Tribunals, 6 International Journal of Criminology & Sociology 52-64 (2017).  

United States Public Support for the International Criminal Court: A Multivariate Analysis of Attitudes and Attributes (with Ryan C. Meldrum) 37 University of Pennsylvania Journal of International Law 739-762 (2015).

United States Foreign Policy and the International Penal Tribunal in the Genocide Convention: Article VI and Beyond, 9 Genocide Studies International 186-207 (2015).

The International Investigator Course in The Hague, 40 The Criminologist 34 (2015).

The Commission on the Responsibility of the Authors of the War and on Enforcement of Penalties and its Contribution to International Criminal Justice After the Second World War, 25 Criminal Law Forum 147-169 (2014).        

Crimes Against Humanity, in Encyclopedia of Transnational Crime and Justice 82-84 (Margaret Beare ed., 2012).

International Crimes, in Encyclopedia of Transnational Crime and Justice 204-206 (Margaret Beare ed., 2012).

Internationalized Criminal Courts, in Encyclopedia of Transnational Crime and Justice 210-211 (Margaret Beare ed., 2012).

Transitional Justice, in Encyclopedia of Transnational Crime and Justice 422-424 (Margaret Beare ed., 2012).

War Crimes, in Encyclopedia of Transnational Crime and Justice 451-453 (Margaret Beare ed., 2012).    

Paris 1919 and Rome 1998: Different Treaties, Different Presidents, Different Senates, and the Same Dilemma, 20 Transnational Law and Contemporary Problems 411-429 (2011). 

International Criminal Courts, in Routledge Handbook of International  Criminology 134-141 (Cindy J. Smith et al. eds. 2011).

Collective Memory, International Law, and Restorative Social Processes after Conflagration:   The Holocaust (with Mary J. Gallant), 20 International Criminal Justice Review 265-279 (2010).

The United States and International Criminal Tribunals: An Historical Analysis, 16 ILSA Journal of International and Comparative Law 19-38 (2009).

An International Criminal Tribunal for Iraq after the First Gulf War: What Should Have Been, 19 International Criminal Justice Review 308-321 (2009). 

The Nuremberg Effect on Contemporary International Criminal Justice, 21 Criminal Justice Studies 361-372 (2008).

War Crimes, in Encyclopedia of Social Problems 1012-1014 (Vincent N. Parrillo ed., 2008).

Kingsley Chiedu Moghalu’s Global Justice: The Politics of War Crimes Trials, 18 International Criminal Justice Review 476-477 (2008) (Book Review).

Martin Shaw’s What is Genocide?, 3 Interdisciplinary Journal of Human Rights Law 87-88 (2008) (Book Review).

Setting the Record Straight: Criminal Justice at Nuremberg, 7 Journal of the Institute of Justice and International Studies 250-260 (2007).

Integration of Police in the United States: Changes and Development after 9/11 (with Allan Y. Jiao), 17 Policing and Society 388-408 (2007).

A Difference of Opinion between the United States and Canada concerning the International Criminal Court (with Allan Y. Jiao), 6 Journal of the Institute of Justice and International Studies 251-258 (2006).

Expertise
  • Comparative Law
  • Criminal Law
  • Human Rights
  • Terrorism (International)